expert

To be an expert or not to be an expert? Which memory for the expert?

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Bernadette Lecerf-Thomas is a trainer-supervisor; she is dedicated to facilitating the appropriation of neurosciences by the actors of business transformation and pedagogy. She has practiced organizational coaching for more than fifteen years. This discipline, about which little is said, was born out of the awareness of those who, having had responsibilities in the company, saw the importance of culture for its performance. Like two sides of the same coin, competence and culture are linked. UP' wanted to relay its analyses and reflections on organisational coaching.

Bernadette Lecerf-Thomas' project - with reference to the knowledge provided by neurosciences - is to help those involved in supporting people and transforming companies to better take into account the assets and constraints of human intelligence.

The word expert comes from the Latin "expertus". The definition is: "A person who has acquired a great deal of knowledge, a great deal of skill in a field. "Bernard Croisile, a neurologist and neuropsychologist and memory specialist, says it takes ten years to make the memory of an expert. In the most common representations, the expert and the manager are perceived as two opposite relational profiles. The expert is described as a technician, a poor communicator and a clumsy manager. The manager is assumed to have no need to know the tricks of the trade. Yet the most competent managers are experts in their field. There is an operational value for the manager to know his job in order to draw part of its legitimacy. For many employees and clients, claiming to manage others without being competent in their field is incongruous. Validating or evaluating the work of employees without knowing the basics is a mental view. Human intelligence cannot subscribe to it when it knows the complexity of evaluating situations and the stakes of decision making in a systemic environment. Every experienced professional is an expert in his or her specialty. It is even possible to be a management expert! So what is the memory of an expert?

There are two types of memory, the memory of knowledge and the memory of skills. Knowledge memory consists of perceptive memory, memory of images, sounds and perceptions in general, semantic memory, memory of vocabulary and facts, and episodic memory, memory of events and emotional situations. The memory of skills is ensured by procedural memory, which allows to memorize sequences of physical, mental and verbal gestures. It is the memory of skills, the one we use to ride a bike, but also to analyze a problem or to respond to an objection.

Knowledge and skills are two different concepts. For example: just because I know the names of the golf clubs, the names of the champions, just because I've watched the Ryder Cup on TV doesn't mean I know how to play golf. I know about golf, but I don't have the skill to play golf. The players know how to hit the ball, they have practiced it for a long time, they have acquired the skill. They can act in all registers of the game, they know how to adapt their movements to the conditions of the problem to be solved, get out of a bunker, execute a long drive or putter. The skills have the particularity of requiring learning by trial and error. Knowledge and skills are mobilized together in most of our approaches. However, when it comes to accompanying skill upgrades, it is important to differentiate between knowledge and skills, as it is useful to work on both registers simultaneously. I may need to know a new vocabulary and know how to implement a new procedure, the two are complementary.

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When the expertise is acquired, whatever the field, all the registers of the briefs are involved. Here's what it's all about for the coach. Each profession has its own models and expressions, technical professions have their own "jargon". From the mourning process, to behavioural profiles, through borrowings from psycho vocabulary, coaching professionals have acquired a semantic memory necessary for the transmission and practice of their profession. Through experience and supervision, the coach develops a sharp perceptive memory that allows him to spot "at first glance" the signs of his client's malaise. The perceptive memory is selective, the expert coach knows what he has to look at and listen to. His episodic memory allows him to keep the memory of his failures and successes and thus to know how to give value to the techniques he uses according to the contexts he perceives. His procedural memory has assimilated different intervention strategies and he applies them in situational intelligence. It also allows him to know how to implement modes of interaction with his clients according to their profile. It is by associating and linking all these data and evaluating their relevance that the professional's brain has become the brain of an expert.

For many beginning coaches, a belief, or rather a confusion, leads to confusing the ability to adopt a low stance - the one who doesn't know - with not being an expert. It is clear that the coach refrains from knowing in the place of his client, leaving him responsible for his decisions. The field of expertise of the coach is of another nature. He is an expert in human sciences. Trained in all kinds of theoretical models and practical tools. He is able to make the links between the context brought by his client, his client's profile, the room for manoeuvre offered by the request in order to choose a profitable mode of interaction and the right tool at the right time ... The coach is, at this stage of his competence, a person who has acquired a great knowledge, a great skill in his field, in short an expert!

PROCESS OF CO-DEVELOPMENT BASED ON NEUROSCIENCE INPUTS

To develop its offer and its practices thanks to neurosciences by reinforcing its current skills.

These groups are intended for individuals who have experience in developing expertise in a given field and who wish to link their expertise to the neurosciences.

- Group of Experts on Individual and Team Support - schedule: Monday 14 January 2013, 11 February, 11 March or 18 March, 15 April, 20 May, 17 June, 8 July, 16 September, 14 October, 25 November. Calendar to be validated on the first day.

- Business Transformation Expert Group - schedule: Monday 7 January 2013, 4 February, 25 February or 4 March, 1 April, 13 May, 10 June, 1 July, 9 September, 7 October, 18 November. Schedule to be validated on the first day.

lecerfthomasBernadette Lecerf-Thomas's website : http://www.lecerfthomas.com 

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