danger sweet drinks

Drinks: Killer sodas!

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Sodas and other sweetened drinks are said to cause up to 184,000 deaths a year worldwide, according to a study published Monday in the American magazine Circulation.
This is the first comprehensive global research analyzing the impact of these beverages in terms of mortality and disability resulting from diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer related to their consumption.

Sccording to the American magazine Trafficit's about"the first research detailing the mortality and disability associated with these products that cause diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer".
Prof. Dariush Mozaffarian's team from Boston University used 62 dietary surveys involving 611,971 people between 1980 and 2010 in 51 countries: 133,000 deaths related to the consumption of these beverages resulted from diabetes, 45,000 from cardiovascular diseases and 6,450 from cancer". All-natural squeezed fruit juices were excluded from the research.

Le Figaro observes "that in France, the mortality rate is estimated at 30 deaths per million adults. » A relatively low result compared to most of these deaths (76%) that are recorded in low- and middle-income countries. The populations of Mexico (405 deaths per million adults) and the United States (125 per million adults) are the most affected by the impact of sugary drinks, placing them in the following positions the second largest in the world. 

However, the newspaper specifies that "the study uses data going back to 2010, i.e. before the introduction in France at the end of 2011 of a tax on sweetened drinks, of 11 cents for 1.5 litres, which caused a drop in consumption of 3.5% in 2012, according to a Senate report".
Le Figaro also points out that "the proportion of young adults suffering from chronic diseases attributed to sweetened beverages was higher than among older adults. These data vary significantly between countries with a mortality of less than 1% in Japan among those over 65 years of age compared to 30% among Mexicans under 45 years of age".
"Low- and middle-income countries are the most affected, accounting for 76% of soda related deaths," the daily continues.
The lead author of the study, Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, Dean of the School of Nutritional Sciences at Tufts University in Boston, notes that "Many countries have a high number of deaths resulting from a single dietary factor, namely soft drinks and other sweet and fruity beverages such as iced teas, and a sharp reduction or elimination of these should be a global priority.

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According to Professor Dariush Mozaffarian, reducing or even eliminating sucrose - white sugar - from our diets can now save thousands of lives. Nutritional balance is achieved by increasing the intake of fruits and vegetables, which are sources of water and vitamins, but also fructose and glucose, two sugars that the body needs.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommended last March to limit the consumption of free or hidden sugars. within 10% of the daily energy ration, or even "if possible" to 5%. The aim is also to combat obesity and dental caries.

Following the recommendations of the WHO, the National Assembly banned in early April 2015 the self-service provision of beverage fountains with added sugar or artificial sweeteners (e.g., with or without payment)."Free refill").
The National Nutrition and Health Programme has set a target of reducing by at least 25% the proportion of children consuming more than half a glass of sweetened drinks a day and is promoting the benchmark of unlimited water consumption, water being the only essential drink.

It is the role of the law to set a framework to protect the population against a commercial overbid that tends to make the "free" surplus of a paying food offer an argument to attract the consumer and incite him/her to certain excessive and unhealthy consumptions".The same is true for many elected officials. 
Favourable to the amendment, Health Minister Marisol Touraine noted that this "This practice, which was common in other countries, is spreading in our country and may be attractive to young people who are offered drinks with either excessive sugar or sweeteners at will.

A policy to be followed in most situations. All countries of the world can draw inspiration from it to formulate dietary recommendations taking into account
locally available foods and eating habits.
Other possible strategies include food and nutrition labelling, consumer information, regulation of the marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages high in free sugars, and tax policies targeting foods high in free sugars.
Everyone can follow these recommendations by making changes to their food choices.

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