Climate disaster

The cost of climatic disasters is exploding

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Direct economic losses due to weather-related disasters over the past 20 years have been 2.5 times higher than in the period 1978-1997, the United Nations said in a report.
 
Dthereupon reportThe United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), explains that climate change "increases the frequency and severity of extreme weather events" and thus the economic losses due to these disasters, hampering the development of countries, especially those with low incomes.
 
According to experts, economic losses due to disasters have surged in recent years, with US$2.908 billion in damage recorded between 1998 and 2017, of which US$2.245 billion, or 77% of the total, was due to climate-related disasters.
This compares with economic losses for the period 1978-1997 of $1,313 billion, of which $895 billion (68%) were climate-related disasters.
 
This report is based on a database established by the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters of the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.
 
In terms of number of events, climate-related disasters accounted for 91% of the approximately 7,200 major events recorded over the past 20 years. Floods and storms are the two most frequently occurring disasters.
 
The largest economic losses were incurred by the United States, with a total value of $944.8 billion, followed by China ($492.2 billion) and Japan ($376.3 billion). India ($79.5 billion) and Puerto Rico ($71.7 billion) followed even further behind.
Storms, floods and earthquakes place three European countries in the Top 10 of economic losses: Germany with 57.9 billion, Italy with 56.6 billion and France with 48.3 billion. Thailand with 52.4 billion and Mexico with 46.5 billion complete this Top 10.
 
Over the past 20 years, 1.3 million people have lost their lives and 4.4 billion people have been injured, made homeless, displaced or required emergency assistance due to disasters, according to the United Nations.
 
 
Source: AFP

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