What energy for the year 2050?

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Energy Transition: What Energy for 2050?  At a time of economic and social crisis, when many Member States are struggling to return to sustainable levels of production and employment, the debate on energy production and use is resurfacing in the European Parliament. Main objectives :lhe coordination of national energy policies and the regular readjustment of the quantified energy targets.

Following the publication in 2011 by the European Commission of the "roadmap for energy on the horizon" 2050″, MEPs approved on Wednesday 13 March the report presented by Liberal MEP Niki Tzavela (377 MEPs in favour, 195 against and 37 abstentions), "European Energy Community", nuclear, renewable energy, energy efficiency... the report examines all the EU's fields of action in an important area of competence.

There is no doubt about the parliamentary report presented by Niki Tzavela. Article 1 of the report explicitly refers to the need for Member States to "work together towards a transformation of the European energy system". In this framework, the EU must play a fundamental role in coordinating the energy policies of all 27, by creating "a common regulatory and legal framework", enabling the ambitious objectives set out in the Commission's roadmap to be achieved.

Ensuring stability and the pursuit of common interests and policies on energy is the role that the EU will have to play in the coming years. 

The creation of a "European Energy Community", mentioned in the first lines of the parliamentary report, would be the culmination of an economically and ecologically fundamental project which, according to Yannick Jadot, who is in charge of the dossier for the EELV parliamentary group, would be "the lever of a new revolution providing concrete responses to the employment and purchasing power needs of citizens".

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For Catherine Trautmann, President of the French Socialist delegation to the European Parliament, the transition towards a "European Energy Community" would allow an essential transfer of competences in terms of taxation and energy mix from the States to the European institutions. In its "roadmap", the European Commission estimates the potential savings that certain Member States could make with the formation of this new "EEC" at 25%.

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