networked car

Autonomous cars will become mobile data centers that will bring in big profits.

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Every second, 29,000 Gigabytes (GB) of information is published worldwide, or 2.5 trillion bytes of data every day, and 88% of this available data is not analysed. In this "datavore" ecosystem, the data generated by connected cars will become a huge market to be analyzed and monetized.
 
Ahe digitalisation of the economy has paved the way for unprecedented data collection, which has been taken up by many players such as Elon Musk or the Gafa who have positioned themselves in the market for the car of the future. In this respect, the United States is one step ahead of Europe. This promising market could reach 750 billion dollars in 2030. In France, it should grow by 63.6% per year on average to reach 2.489 billion euros in 2021. Very recently, the American manufacturer Ford invested 1 billion dollars in an artificial intelligence startup in order to make progress in the field of autonomous driving. These are just a few examples that reflect the enormous stakes involved in exploiting and analysing this data.
 
Indeed, these vehicles of tomorrow will be sensor-clad, automated and connected to the cloud. Necessary for driving assistance functions such as automatic piloting, these sensors are also valuable data suckers. These will be of a behavioral nature to improve driver comfort and well-being, but also technical to facilitate the smooth operation of the vehicle with its environment. They will also have both a public and a private character that will go beyond purely automotive considerations. The connected car is a new point of contact for an increasingly personalized customer experience. As a result, they will bring new requirements in terms of traceability, insurance and security, a sine qua non condition to protect against cyber-attacks.
 
For example, if you are involved in a car accident, different entities may want or require access to your car data. A judge or an insurance company might need it to determine liability, while an automobile manufacturer might want to optimize the performance of brakes or other mechanical systems. Self-aware data can be tagged to control who sees which part of it and when, without further delay or potentially error-prone human intervention, to subdivide, approve and disseminate this valuable data.
 

The art of monetizing data from connected cars

 
An autonomous test car creates between 5 and 50 terabytes per day, which is a commercial value generating opportunities, particularly via :
● The direct monetization of data, which involves treating it as an asset and creating new sources of income. This can be achieved by offering an API that provides access to data analysis or by selling licenses to wholesalers, retailers or brokers to access the raw data.
● Indirect data monetization, on the other hand, will allow information to be used to improve business operations and services to see exactly how the data can impact business operations.
 
 
Data analysis is also the main vehicle for improving "smart cities" to help improve the quality of life of citizens and make their cities more sustainable. Obtaining information via algorithms enables real-time administration and regulation of resources that will make it possible to establish a mobility that is both innovative and sustainable. Mobility and smart city stakeholders must therefore work together to create effective solutions that will guarantee a positive impact on motorway traffic, road safety, vehicle design and the environment, while at the same time providing high value-added services for consumers. Moreover, the issue inherent in the management of data generated by connected cars is complex and not yet fully regulated. Legislation will have to decide on this aspect of "data ownership", particularly with regard to the DPMR in force from 25 May next, which aims to regulate the management of personal data. Vigilance is required so that they are not shared with anyone, nor can they be hacked.
 
Managing this "interconnectivity" implies increased collaboration and collaborative logic between public and private players such as: cloud data management companies (hybrid), car manufacturers, telecom players, government and communities.
 
Automotive connectivity will only work if the collection, accessibility and analysis of data is managed and thought out correctly, underpinned by adequate technologies to manage data storage, scalable enough to support the development of new functionalities and the growth of the IoT market (35 billion objects in 2030).
 
Mathias RobichonTechnical Director NetApp France
 

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